Representation Matters a Lot in Indie Film “For Izzy”

Will Yu, the creator of activist movements #StarringJohnCho and #SeeAsAmStar, daily tweets, “Representation matters today.”

If that’s true – and I’m of the opinion that it is – then the award-winning indie film For Izzy matters as much as anything I’ve seen in years. It’s a heartbreaking, yet hopeful story that presents several types of characters rarely seen in other productions.

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God Bless America, Even Now

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The Trump Hotel in Tornillo, Texas. Just for kids, how fun! (Photo: Reuters)

Anyone else feeling a bit less gung-ho about our country these days? News of 4100 kids ripped from their parents’ arms, in our name and using our tax dollars, can have that effect.

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This Administration Lies in Jesus’ Name

From the D.C. Families Belong Together march. (Photo: Holly Chuang)

Allow me to put my four-year master’s degree in theology and my twelve-plus years of full-time pastoral service to some use.

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Where Have You Gone, Justice Kennedy?

I trust that I’m not the only one who feels as if forces much larger than us and way beyond our control are pulling our country further into darkness, and, I would say, further into sin. I don’t believe that the U.S. has ever been a “Christian country” – a nation born and expanded by genocide and ethnic cleansing, dependent on slave labor for its prosperity, could never be “Christian” – but it sure feels as if whatever goodness our society still possesses is slipping away.

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Once Upon a Time, the Wall Was for Me

As a means of crying for my beloved country, I posted these images on social media earlier this week. The response has been heartfelt. I share the pictures here in the hope that they’re useful to you as well.

I was in the 7th grade when I first learned of the Chinese Exclusion Act, signed by President Arthur in 1882 and augmented by subsequent laws. I didn’t even learn about it from my history textbook or my teacher; it was something my group project team unearthed digging through library books.

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My Family’s Refugee Story

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This is the first in a series of four photos by award-winning Getty Images photographer John Moore. Here, a Honduran mother seeking asylum nurses her toddler just inside the Texas border. They’ve been traveling for about a month, she tells Moore.

Yesterday, we marked World Refugee Day, and we did so under surreal circumstances. The uproar over the current administration’s policy of forcibly taking migrant children from the arms of their parents and sending them en masse to shelters far away continued to burn, despite the president’s signing an executive order supposedly stopping the practice. The same day, the administration’s Secretary of State praised the “strength, courage, and resilience” of refugees.

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Dr. Mai Khanh Tran: Slaying Giants

Last Friday, I met up with Dr. Mai Khanh Tran, who’s running for the House of Representatives in California’s 39th Congressional District. Our meetup took place only a few hours after news outlets reported the mass shooting at Santa Fe High School outside of Houston.

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Chatting in Rowland Heights.

Feminist Asian Dad (F.A.D.): That high school is less than 15 miles from my own.

Dr. Tran: I’m so heartbroken by what’s happening.

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